Day 15 – The perfect Winter Read

img_1497

For today’s challenge „The perfect winter read“ I chose Anna Karenina. It has been years ago that I read it but it was the perfect setting. Travelling from Moskau to then Leningrad by train through the most wonderful winter landscape.

I remember the wonderful language, the hopelessness of the situation and Anna Karenina’s despair.The psychological finesse of Tolstoi is unique and it is impossible not to feel and often suffer with the characters.

Remember when Anna confesses to her husband that she is pregnant by her lover ?

Or when Anna realises her and Wronskis love is fading away:

„Die zwischen ihnen bestehende gereizte Stimmung hatte keine äußere Ursache, und alle Versuche einer gegenseitigen Aussprache dienten nicht zur Beseitigung dieser Stimmung, sondern im Gegenteil zu ihrer Verschärfung. Diese gereizte Stimmung kam von innen her und hatte bei Anna ihren Grund in dem Schwächerwerden seiner Liebe und bei Wronski in der Reue darüber, daß er sich um ihretwillen in eine so peinliche Lage gebracht habe, die sie ihm, statt sie ihm zu erleichtern, immer noch schwerer mache. Keiner von beiden sprach sich über den Grund seiner Gereiztheit aus; aber jeder von ihnen war überzeugt, daß der andere im Unrecht sei, und bemühte sich bei jedem Anlaß, es ihm zu beweisen. “

Should you ever travel to Russia don’t travel without Anna Karenina. It was a wonderful trip but incredibly cold –  I had to buy hand muffs and a hat which made me look quite Anna Karenina like. We walked over the the frozen Baltic Sea in St. Petersburg with Krim Sekt and I never felt more like being in the novel I’m currently reading than at that time.

What is your perfect Winter Read ?

Advertisements

Day 13 – Turned into a good movie

IMG_8383

„Roadside Picnic“ is an incredibly gripping SciFi novel written while the U.S.S.R. was still alive and kicking, although it wasn’t published until years after it was first written. The authors are two brothers and their way of tackling SciFi is definitely different from your standard Anglo-American Futurism.

In the town of Harmont, in an unnamed country (that quite clearly isn’t Russia), exists a so-called „Zone“, one of several around the world, left behind by „The Visitation“ of unknown aliens years ago.

„Roadside Picnic“ is a story about so-called „stalkers“. These guys vemtire into the extremely dangerous Zone to retrieve alien artifacts. The aliens have left behind many unique, useful and beautiful objects some of which humans cannot even begin to understand or manufacture themselves. Still there is quite the demand for these objects and because it’s pretty dangerous to obtain them, the stalkers are paid pretty well for them. There are a lot of dangers in the Zone and many Stalkers were killed or severely injured in the Zone.

The title „Roadside Picnic“ refers to the idea that maybe the aliens just left a bunch of junk behind at the sites of their visits, quite like Humans when they go to a roadside picnic and leave behind some paper plates, empty beer cans, a bbq etc.

„A picnic. Picture a forest, a country road, a meadow. Cars drive off the country road into the meadow, a group of young people get out carrying bottles, baskets of food, transistor radios, and cameras. They light fires, pitch tents, turn on the music. In the morning they leave. The animals, birds, and insects that watched in horror through the long night creep out from their hiding places. And what do they see? Old spark plugs and old filters strewn around… Rags, burnt-out bulbs, and a monkey wrench left behind… And of course, the usual mess—apple cores, candy wrappers, charred remains of the campfire, cans, bottles, somebody’s handkerchief, somebody’s penknife, torn newspapers, coins, faded flowers picked in another meadow.”

This complete trivialisation of the contact is so different from anything you read about in SciFi. No first contact, no failed communication attempts. No obvious reason for this visit whatsoever. We were just not that interesting to this visiting species from outer space.
A pretty pointless roadstop and a bunch of leftover rubbish – which still affects the lives of people around the mysterious Zones.

Stalking in the Zone is forbidden and dangerous so there are just a few left have that have not been hounded by the police, killed or are imprisoned. The main character is Redric „Red“ Schuhart. He is one of the last real stalker left. He’s tough and experienced and although he does have a soft spot for family members but he can be pretty mean and hard some times.

He is in love with Guta, his girlfriend at the beginning of the novel, who gets pregnant and they have a little daughter they call monkey. Being in the Zone seems to alter the DNA of the Stalkers and their offspring often is misfigured or disabled.

Directly or indirectly, the Zone plays havoc on Harmont, the treasures bring money but at a pretty high price to Harmont’s inhabitants. In Red’s life nearly everyone around him is harmed directly or indirectly by the Zone. A lot of people die and his family is affected in various but enough of the details, I want to avoid spoilers.

The book is short, the writing crisp and refreshing and it was hard for me to believe that this book was written years before the catastrophy in Chernobyl. A desaster that created Zone-like areas and ghost cities just like Harmont.

“The hypothesis of God, for instance, gives an incomparably absolute opportunity to understand everything and know absolutely nothing. Give man an extremely simplified system of the world and explain every phenomenon away on the basis of that system. An approach like that doesn’t require any knowledge. Just a few memorized formulas plus so-called intuition and so-called common sense.” 

I loved the novel, it made the TOP 10 of my favorite SciFi novels – did I now convince you to read it? 🙂

This is the novel on which Andrei Tarkovsky based the motion picture Stalker and incredibly great movie with a wonderful soundtrack. Here is a link to the movie in Russian with english subtitles:

Auf deutsch erschien der Roman unter dem Titel „Picknick am Wegesrand“ beim Suhrkamp Verlag.

Day 2 Book-a-Day Challenge: Last Read

We – Yevgeny Zamyatin

As the very happy Reader of the „Happy Reader“ magazine I finally managed to read the book of the upcoming edition beforehand, so I can happily participate in the online and offline book discussion.

The dystopian novel was on my reading list anyway as it counts as sort of a precessor of Aldous Huxely’s „Brave New World“ or George Orwell’s „1984“ and having read the novel now, I can totally relate to that.

„Isn’t it clear that individual consciousness ist just sickness?“

The story takes place in the future within a united totalitarian state. The urban city almost entirely constructed of glass so everything is constantly under surveillance and everybody lives a strongly reglemented life where people are numbers instead of having a name. The state is governed by the „Benefactor“ and the „Guardians“ and surrounded by a huge wall that protects the people in the city from nature outside of the city and the wood people that live there.

“The only means of ridding man of crime is ridding him of freedom.”

The narrator is D-503 a mathematican and constructor of the space ship „Integral“ that the state is planning to use to colonize and integrate our planets. When D-503 illicitly falls in love with the mysterious I-330 his well-defined mathematical world descends into chaos. He starts to dream, misses work and the assigned walks and also starts to neglect his other lover 0-90 and his friend R-13 a state poet.

A doctor diagnoses him with having developed a soul and if it not have been that he is vital for building the spaceship, he would have been deemed uncurable and hence terminated. Out of love to I-330 he agrees to sabotage the Integral Project…

The language is quite sparse, with a lot of mathematical-technical words and references to Taylorism.

Many of the names and numbers in „We“ are allusions to personal experiences of Zamyatin or to culture and literature. Auditorium 112 for example refers back to the prison cell 112 where Zamyatin was inprisoned twice.

In light of the increasingly dogmatic Soviet government of the time, Zamyatin seems to make the point that it would seem to be impossible to remove all the rebels against a system. Zamyatin even says this through I-330: „There is no final revolution. Revolutions are infinite.“

„We“ was the first book that was banned by the Soviet censorship bureau in 1921. Zamyatin’s influence in the literary world declined further throughout the 1920s and he was eventually allowed to emigrate to Paris in 1931 (in contrast to his writer colleague Mikhail Bulgakov who applied for emigration for years and was never allowed to either publish or leave)

The novel was first published in English in 1924, readers in the Soviet Union had to wait for its publication until 1988, when glasnot resulted in the book being available alongside George Orwell’s „1984“.

The ZDF adapted the book for television in 1982 under the title of „Wir“:

There is also a short film called „The Glass Fortress“ by the french director Alain Bourrett:

I can highly recommend „We“ it really is a dystopian classic that still sounds fresh and unfortunately current, even though the Soviet Union has long disappeared.

What was the last book you read and would you recommend it?

Books & Booze: Lolita

“It was love at first sight, at last sight, at ever and ever sight.”

 

Wenige Bücher polarisieren so sehr wie „Lolita“, bei dem selbst Buchhändlerinnen gelegentlich zugeben, es nicht lesen zu wollen, schließlich handle es sich beim Protagonisten um einen Pädophilen. Ich bin selbst reichlich skeptisch an das Buch herangegangen beim ersten Lesen, war dann aber schon nach wenigen Seiten vom Nabokov-Virus infiziert. Es ist nach wie vor eines meiner absoluten Lieblingsbücher.

Diese Woche sollte es eine Vodka-basierter Cocktail sein, da liegt es nahe, dass wir uns literarisch nach Russland begeben. Die Wahl fiel beim Cocktail auf einen White Russian und als Liberaler alter Schule passte der unserer Ansicht nach von all den russischen Autoren in unserem Regal am besten zu Nabokov.

Books & Booze Logo

Die Nabokov-Enthusiasten werden jetzt wahrscheinlich über uns herfallen, denn ja, er trank anscheinend gar keinen Vodka, eher einen Gin&Tonic oder einen Whisky, aber Vodka eher nicht. Da sehen wir jetzt mal großzügig drüber hinweg genießen unseren Drink, trinken auf Nabokov und versuchen euch (erneute?) Lust auf „Lolita“ zu machen.

Nabokov schrieb das Buch 1955 auf einem seiner jährlichen Schmetterlings-Sammel-Trips im Westen der Vereinigten Staaten. Seine Frau Véra agierte als Sekretärin, Typistin, Editorin, Übersetzerin, Agentin, Anwältin, Managerin, Chauffeurin, sie übernahm die Recherchen für ihn und nebenbei war sie auch noch Lehrassistentin und Vertretungs-Dozentin an einer Universität. Bei dieser Aufzählung wurde uns schwindelig, wir mussten uns kurz setzen und wollten unbedingt sofort und auf der Stelle einen doppelten White Russian für Véra mixen und ihr einen Gutschein für ein Wellness-Wochenende überreichen.

Sie war es auch, die Vladimir Nabokov stoppte, als er den Entwurf für „Lolita“ ins Feuer werfen wollte. Eine Frau mit Nerven aus Stahl und wir sind uns 100% sicher, ohne sie gäbe es Lolita nicht – in jeglicher Hinsicht.

Der Plot von Lolita ist den meisten wahrscheinlich weitestgehend bekannt. Humbert Humbert, ein Herr mittleren Alters, entwickelt eine leidenschaftliche Obsession für die zwölfjährige Dolores Haze. Er heiratet ihre Mutter, um Dolores nahe zu sein und macht sich nach dem Tod der Mutter mir ihr auf einen Road Trip durch die USA.

Ein britischer Kritiker nannte es kurz nach Erscheinen das Buch „the filthiest book I have ever read“, macht euch selbst ein Bild – wir halten es für eines der ganz großen Werke in der Weltliteratur.

Hier ein kurzes Interview mit Nabokov zu Lolita:

Hier das Rezept für das Nakokov-Begleitgetränk „White Russian“ aus dem Labor der Münchner Küchenexperimente – lasst es Euch schmecken.

4 cl Vodka

3 cl Kaffeelikör (Favorit: Kahlua)

3 cl Sahne

3 Eiswürfel

Die Eistwürfel mit dem Vodka und dem Kaffeelikör in ein Glas geben und kurz durchrühren. Anschließend die Sahne in einem geschlossenen Behältnis kurz, aber kräftig schütteln, so dass es etwas fester wird. Dann vorsichtig auf die Vodka-Kaffeelikör-Mischung geben.

White Russian

Nastrovje!

Short and Sweet

Es wird mal wieder Zeit für eine Short and Sweet Session, jedes Einzelne der Bücher hätte eine ausführliche Rezension verdient, die Binge Readerin ist aber zu faul und möchte ihren Stapel wegbekommen, daher hier kurz und knackig die Kurzrezensionen der gelesenen und bisher noch nicht rezensierten Bücher der letzten Wochen.

Ich lasse dem wunderbaren Dandy Fritz J Raddatz den Vortritt, dessen Erinnerungen „Unruhestifer“ mich sehr begeistert haben. Habe ihn ehrlich gesagt erst seit kürzerer Zeit auf dem Radar, ausgelöst meine ich durch ein Interview in „druckfrisch“ vor ein paar Jahren, aber wow – was für eine spannende Persönlichkeit.

Er war meine passende Reisebegleitung nach Hamburg.

Raddatz

Seine Erinnerungen sind eine actionreiche, glamouröse Tour de Force durch den Kulturbetrieb der BRD. Der ehemalige Programmchef des Rowohlt-Verlages und ehemalige Feuilleton-Chef der Zeit hat als Literaturkritiker, Autoren-Entdecker und Feuilletonist überall mächtig Staub aufgewirbelt und kein Stein auf dem anderen gelassen. Für mich waren insbesondere der Anfang, seine Wurzeln, Familienhintergründe und seine späten Erinnerungen von besonderem Interesse, da ich doch mit einigen Namen aus dem früheren Kulturbetrieb nicht wirklich etwas anfangen konnte. Herr Raddatz schaut dem Feuilleton unter den Rock und wir ihm voyeuristisch dabei über die Schulter. Unbedingt kaufen und lesen.

„Unsere Beziehung, die wir – und wir beide wissen, warum – sachlich gehalten haben, weil Nähe nur aus Distanz möglich ist, weil man sich nicht duzt, wenn man sich per Sie näher ist – diese Beziehung sollte erlauben, auch spontan für den anderen da zu sein, ohne sich Intimitäten breit auszuwalzen.“

bestarium

Von meiner entzückenden Buchmessen-Begleiterin Birgit von Sätze und Schätze habe ich kürzlich passenderweise Raddatz‘ „Bestarium der deutschen Literatur“ geschenkt bekommen, das bot sich natürlich gleich als Anschlusslektüre an. Die literarischen Fabeltiere der Gegenwartsliteratur sind ausgesprochen charmant und die Zeichnungen von Klaus Ensikat absolut meisterhaft.

Jane Jacobs – The Godmother of the American City ist die legendäre Autorin des einflussreichen Buches „The Death and Life of Great American Cities“ das seit seinem Erscheinen 1961 ununterbrochen wieder verlegt wurde und die maßgeblich Einfluss auf die Disziplinen Stadtplanung und städtische Architektur genommen hat.

jane Jacobs

In der „Last Interview„-Reihe umfasst ihre Interview aus den Jahren 1962, 1978, 2001 und das letzte aus dem Jahr 2005.  Die Gespräche beleuchten die einzigartige Karriere der beliebten und einflussreichen Intellektuellen und Aktivistin, die sich schon in den 60er Jahren des vorigen Jahrhunderts für eine organische nachhaltige Stadtplanung eingesetzt hat.

Jane Jacobs ist in Deutschland noch recht unbekannt, als Einstieg kann ich diesen Band absolut empfehlen. Eine brilliante Analystin, Ökonomin und politische Kommentatorin, die sich lohnt kennenzulernen.

„Jacobs has probably bludgeoned more old songs, rallied more support, fought harder, caused more trouble, and made more enemies than any other American woman … She is the terror of every politican in town“

Eine unterhaltsame Zugfahrt bereitete mir vor einer ganzen Weile schon Daniel Kehlmanns „F“ – der Roman erzählt von drei Brüdern, die – jeder auf seine Weise – Betrüger, Heuchler, Fälscher sind. Das „F“ hängt von Anfang an schicksalsschwer über ihren Köpfen in Form von Familie, Fälschung, Fehlentscheidungen und das Kapitel mit dem Hypnotiseur war einfach nur brilliant, zum Ende hin ist es etwas abgefallen, aber Kehlmann ist eigentlich immer ein Garant für Unterhaltung auf hohem Niveau.

Kehlmann

„Keiner konnte einem helfen. Kein Buch, kein Lehrer. Alles Entscheidende musste man aus eigener Kraft lernen, und gelang es nicht, hatte man sein Leben verfehlt. Iwan fragte sich oft, wie Leute, die nichts Besonderes konnten, das Dasein eigentlich ertrugen.“

Vladimir NabokovsInvitation to a Beheading“ verkörpert die reichlich bizarre Vision einer komplett irrationalen und absurden Welt. In der März-Lektüre unseres Bookclubs geht es um einen jungen Mann namens Cincinnatus, der in einem nicht genannten Land im Gefängnis sitzt und auf seine Hinrichtung wartet. Seine Begegnungen dort sind komplett irrational und reichen von Henkern, die sich als Gefangene maskieren, bis hin zu phantastischen Gefängniswärtern und künstlichen Spinnen.

Im Inneren des Traumzustandes herrscht jedoch eine gewisse Logik, die der Erzählung seine Glaubwürdigkeit verleiht: Wir glauben, dass in einem totalitären Staat das Schicksal eines Cincinnatus nur allzu real ist. Das erinnert an die Megalomanie der Tyrannen, die ja leider gerade wieder Hochkonjunktur haben.

Nabokov

“But then I have long since grown accustomed to the thought that what we call dreams is semi-reality, the promise of reality, a foreglimpse and a whiff of it; that is they contain, in a very vague, diluted state, more genuine reality than our vaunted waking life which, in its turn, is semi-sleep, an evil drowsiness into which penetrate in grotesque disguise the sounds and sights of the real world, flowing beyond the periphery of the mind—as when you hear during sleep a dreadful insidious tale because a branch is scraping on the pane, or see yourself sinking into snow because your blanket is sliding off.”

Die Angst eines Sträflings in der Todeszelle wirkt unglaublich beklemmend und man teilt seine Unglauben über seine Umstände, seine Reue für nicht wirklich begangene Verstöße und Misserfolge und seine falsche Hoffnung auf Rettung. Wenn Cincinnatus am Ende auf dem Weg zur Hinrichtung ist, lässt er seinen Henker durch die Kraft seiner Gedanken verschwinden und mit ihm zerfällt die gesamte Welt um ihn herum. Oder nicht?

Cincinnatus hätte sich sicherlich gut mit Kafkas K oder Figuren aus Becketts Stücken verstanden, das Absurde hat nicht jedem in unserem Bookclub zugesagt, auf die wunderschöne Sprache Nabokovs konnten wir uns hingegen absolut einigen. Ich kam aus dem Unterstreichen gar nicht mehr hinaus. „Lolita“ ist nach wie vor mein absoluter Lieblingsroman von Nabokov, aber dieses kleine Büchlein hat es absolut in sich – große Empfehlung von mir.

“What are these hopes, and who is this savior?” “Imagination,” replied Cincinnatus.”

  • Fritz J. Raddatz – „Unruhestifter“ ist im Ullstein Verlag erschienen
  • Fritz J. Raddatz – „Bestarium der deutschen Literatur“ ist im Rowohlt Verlag erschienen
  • Jane Jacobs – „The Last Interview“ ist bei Melville House erschienen
  • Daniel Kehlmann – „F“ ist im Rowohlt Verlag erschienen
  • Vladimir Nabokov – „Invitation to a Beheading“ ist auf deutsch unter dem Titel „Einladung zur Enthauptung“ im Rowohlt Verlag erschienen

Book-a-Day Christmas Challenge

I think it’s time for a another challenge. As I don’t have an Advent-calendar this year I would like to have a nice little book-a-day Challenge. Couldn’t find THE perfect ready-made one, so I came up with my own.

Wanna join ? presentation1

For today’s challenge „The perfect winter read“ I chose Anna Karenina. It has been years ago that I read it but it was the perfect setting. Travelling from Moskau to then Leningrad by train through the most wonderful winter landscape.

img_1497

I remember the wonderful language, the hopelessness of the situation and Anna Karenina’s despair.The psychological finesse of Tolstoi is unique and it is impossible not to feel and often suffer with the characters.

Remember when Anna confesses to her husband that she is pregnant by her lover ?

Or when Anna realises her and Wronskis love is fading away:

„Die zwischen ihnen bestehende gereizte Stimmung hatte keine äußere Ursache, und alle Versuche einer gegenseitigen Aussprache dienten nicht zur Beseitigung dieser Stimmung, sondern im Gegenteil zu ihrer Verschärfung. Diese gereizte Stimmung kam von innen her und hatte bei Anna ihren Grund in dem Schwächerwerden seiner Liebe und bei Wronski in der Reue darüber, daß er sich um ihretwillen in eine so peinliche Lage gebracht habe, die sie ihm, statt sie ihm zu erleichtern, immer noch schwerer mache. Keiner von beiden sprach sich über den Grund seiner Gereiztheit aus; aber jeder von ihnen war überzeugt, daß der andere im Unrecht sei, und bemühte sich bei jedem Anlaß, es ihm zu beweisen. “

Should you ever travel to Russia don’t travel without Anna Karenina. It was a wonderful trip but incredibly cold –  I had to buy hand muffs and a hat which made me look quite Anna Karenina like. We walked over the the frozen Baltic Sea in St. Petersburg with Krim Sekt and I never felt more like being in the novel I’m currently reading than at that time.

What is your perfect Winter Read ?

 

Short but sweet

Nein sie haben nicht wirklich etwas miteinander zu tun die drei, außer das ich sie erst kürzlich gelesen und noch nicht besprochen habe. Für die Ausführlichkeit fehlt mir momentan die Zeit, daher heute drei auf einen Schlag und das ganze short und sweet.

Aharon Appelfeld – „Geschichte eines Lebens“

Ein ungewöhnliche, berührende Biografie – trotz aller Schrecklichkeit, die der Geschichte eines Holocaust-Überlebenden innewohnt. Appelfeld zeichnet fesselnde kleine Vignetten, in denen er immer wieder über die Schwierigkeit des Erinnerns sinniert.

Er beschreibt die Zeit bevor seine Mutter getötet wurde, seine Flucht aus dem Ghetto, in dem er mit seinem Vater und Onkel eingesperrt war und seine einsamen Jahre auf der Flucht, die er teils im Wald, teils arbeitend bei anderen Familien verbrachte. Sein unerschütterlicher Glaube, von seiner Mutter und seiner Familie gefunden zu werden, seine Schwierigkeiten als Jugendlicher in Israel Fuß zu fassen, sind bewegend, ohne je sentimental zu werden.

appelfeld

Ein wunderschönes, bedächtiges Buch, dem ich mit meiner Kurzbeschreibung hier nicht gerecht genug werde. Eine sehr gute Rezension findet ihr bei Sätze und Schätze, dort wurde ich auch an das Buch erinnert, das schon seit längerer Zeit bei mir im Regal stand.

 

Rebecca Solnit – Hoffnung in der Dunkelheit

Ein wiedergelesenes Buch, denn Solnit ist eine Autorin, die ich so sehr schätze und als ich es aus dem Regal holte, da brauchte ich etwas Hoffnung und die versteht Solnit zu geben. Meine leisen Befürchtungen, die Essays aus dem Jahr 2004 könnten vielleicht überholt wirken, waren absolut unbegründet.

Schon 2004 beschäftigte sich Solnit mit Hoffnung in dunklen Zeiten und auch wenn man aus heutiger Sicht glauben mag, 2004 war es doch lange noch nicht so schlimm wie heute, jede Zeit hat seine dunklen Phasen und wir müssen lernen den Optimismus nicht zu verlieren.

solnit

Solnit versucht die hellen Flecken zu finden, nicht nur die Niederlagen zu sehen, sondern die vielen Siege, die es im Laufe der Geschichte immer wieder gegeben hat. Sie beschäftigt sich mit der Geschichte des politischen und gesellschaftlichen Aktivismus der letzten fünf Jahrzehnte. Vom Fall der Mauer zu den weltweiten Protesten gegen den Irak Krieg. Sie versucht neue Perspektiven aufzuzeigen, in dem man nicht den Misserfolg sieht, weil der Krieg nicht gestoppt wurde, sondern den Erfolg, denn es wurden zahlreiche wertvolle Netzwerke, Gemeinschaften etc. geschaffen.

“Perfection is a stick with which to beat the possible.” 

Solnit ist eine Autorin, die mir direkt aufs Herz schreibt. Die hoffnungsvoll und optimistisch ist und wilde Möglichkeiten sieht. Die aber auch kritisiert und den Finger draufhält, wo es weh tut. .

“People have always been good at imagining the end of the world, which is much easier to picture than the strange sidelong paths of change in a world without end.”

Hoffnung in der Dunkelheit stand im Regal, als ich gerade etwas Hoffnung brauchte, aber ohne mich zu weit aus dem Fenster zu lehnen, kann ich ihre Bücher einfach grundsätzlich empfehlen.

Thomas Pyczek – Ende der Welt

Nein, keine Dystopie, auch wenn der Titel und meine Vorliebe für dieses Genre das vielleicht nahelegen. Eine Reise in die Vergangenheit, die bis ans Ende der Welt führt. Eine gute Mischung aus Krimi, Reiseliteratur mit einem Schuss Liebe und Erotik.

1991 beschließt André, eine Reise durch Amerika zu machen, bevor er sich endgültig niederlässt und dem Ernst des Lebens widmet. Er kommt bis Feuerland. In Ushuaia trifft er eine geheimnisvolle Frau und verschwindet.

img_0408

20 Jahre später macht sich Andrés damalige Freundin mit dem gemeinsamen Sohn  auf die Suche, um endlich zu erfahren was damals passierte. Doch kaum in Ushuaia angekommen, verschwindet auch Jan …

Wer eine Reise nach Feuerland plant, sollte das Buch unbedingt einpacken, es ist aber auch spannend, wenn man es auf der anderen Seite der Welt liest.

Freue mich, wenn ich mit dem einen oder anderen Buch Interesse wecken konnte. Bin gespannt auf Eure Rückmeldungen.

„Geschichte eines Lebens“ ist im Rowohlt Verlag erschienen.
„Hoffnung in der Dunkelheit“ ist im Pendo Verlag erschienen.
„Ende der Welt“ ist hier erhältlich.